Loss of innocence in the sound and the fury by william faulkner

A story told in four chapters, by four different voices, and out of chronological order, The Sound and the Fury requires intense concentration and patience to interpret and understand. The first three chapters of the novel consist of the convoluted thoughts, voices, and memories of the three Compson brothers, captured on three different days. The brothers are Benjy, a severely retarded thirty-three-year-old man, speaking in April, ; Quentin, a young Harvard student, speaking in June, ; and Jason, a bitter farm-supply store worker, speaking again in April, The Compsons are one of several prominent names in the town of Jefferson, Mississippi.

Loss of innocence in the sound and the fury by william faulkner

The Folio Society colour-coded edition of William Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury. When William Faulkner was asked by the Paris Review to share his thoughts on the art of fiction in , he. Essays About The Sound and the Fury; Growth, Confusion, and the Loss of Innocence: The Differing Roles of Childlike Narration in Roy's The God of Small Things and Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury. ANALYSIS BY SECTION. The Sound and the Fury (). William Faulkner () TITLE. The title refers to a phrase from Macbeth by Shakespeare: Life is “a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.”.

The novel centers on the Compson familyformer Southern aristocrats who are struggling to deal with the dissolution of their family and its reputation. Over the course of the 30 years or so related in the novel, the family falls into financial ruin, loses its religious faith and the respect of the town of Jefferson, and many of them die tragically.

The novel is separated into four distinct sections.

The first, April 7,is written from the perspective of Benjamin "Benjy" Compson, an intellectually disabled year-old man.

The characteristics of his impairment are not clear, but it is implied that he has a learning disability. Benjy's section is characterized by a highly disjointed narrative style with frequent chronological leaps.

The second section, June 2,focuses on Quentin CompsonBenjy's older brother, and the events leading up to his suicide. In the third section, set a day before the first, on April 6,Faulkner writes from the point of view of Jason, Quentin's cynical younger brother.

In the fourth and final section, set a day after the first, on April 8,Faulkner introduces a third person omniscient point of view. The last section primarily focuses on Dilsey, one of the Compsons' black servants. Jason is also a focus in the section, but Faulkner presents glimpses of the thoughts and deeds of everyone in the family.

It contains a page history of the Compson family from to April 7, [ edit ] The first section of the novel is narrated by Benjamin "Benjy" Compson, a source of shame to the family due to his diminished mental capacity; the only characters who show a genuine care for him are Caddy, his older sister; and Dilsey, a matriarchal servant.

Loss of innocence in the sound and the fury by william faulkner

His narrative voice is characterized predominantly by its nonlinearity: The presence of italics in Benjy's section is meant to indicate significant shifts in the narrative. Originally Faulkner meant to use different colored inks to signify chronological breaks.

This nonlinearity makes the style of this section particularly challenging, but Benjy's style develops a cadence that, while not chronologically coherent, provides unbiased insight into many characters' true motivations.

Moreover, Benjy's caretaker changes to indicate the time period: Luster in the present, T. In this section we see Benjy's three passions: But by Caddy has been banished from the Compson home after her husband divorced her because her child was not his, and the family has sold his favorite pasture to a local golf club in order to finance Quentin's Harvard education.

In the opening scene, Benjy, accompanied by Luster, a servant boy, watches golfers on the nearby golf course as he waits to hear them call "caddie"—the name of his favorite sibling. When one of them calls for his golf caddie, Benjy's mind embarks on a whirlwind course of memories of his sister, Caddy, focusing on one critical scene.

In when their grandmother died, the four Compson children were forced to play outside during the funeral. In order to see what was going on inside, Caddy climbed a tree in the yard, and while looking inside, her brothers—Quentin, Jason and Benjy—looked up and noticed that her underwear was muddy. This is Benjy's first memory, and he associates Caddy with trees throughout the rest of his arc, often saying that she smells like trees.

Other crucial memories in this section are Benjy's change of name from Maury, after his uncle in upon the discovery of his disability; the marriage and divorce of Caddyand Benjy's castrationresulting from an attack on a girl that is alluded to briefly within this chapter when a gate is left unlatched and Benjy is out unsupervised.

Readers often report trouble understanding this portion of the novel due to its impressionistic language necessitated by Benjamin's mental abilities, as well as its frequent shifts in time and setting.

June 2, [ edit ] Quentin, the most intelligent of the Compson children, gives the novel's best example of Faulkner's narrative technique. We see him as a freshman at Harvardwandering the streets of Cambridgecontemplating death, and remembering his family's estrangement from his sister Caddy.

Like the first section, its narrative is not strictly linear, though the two interweaving threads, of Quentin at Harvard on the one hand, and of his memories on the other, are clearly discernible.

Loss of innocence in the sound and the fury by william faulkner

Quentin's main obsession is Caddy's virginity and purity.The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner. Home / Literature / The Sound and the Fury / Quotes / Innocence ; Quotes / Innocence ; SHMOOP PREMIUM Summary SHMOOP PREMIUM SHMOOP .

The Sound and the Fury is a novel written by the American author William Faulkner. It employs a number of narrative styles, including stream of consciousness.

As Mr. Compson says, innocence can only be recognized once it’s been lost. That doesn’t mean, however, that people won’t chase the ideal it represents forever. No coming of age story is complete without a loss of innocence; in The Sound and the Fury, we have loss upon loss upon loss. The Sound and the Fury is a novel written by the American author William initiativeblog.com employs a number of narrative styles, including stream of initiativeblog.comhed in , The Sound and the Fury was Faulkner's fourth novel, and was not immediately successful. In , however, when Faulkner's sixth novel, Sanctuary, was published—a sensationalist story, which Faulkner later . The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner. Home / Literature / The Sound and the Fury / Quotes / Innocence ; Quotes / Innocence ; SHMOOP PREMIUM Summary SHMOOP PREMIUM SHMOOP .

Published in , The Sound and the Fury was Faulkner's fourth novel, and was not immediately successful. - The Sound and the Fury, William Faulkner () 'I'd have wasted a lot of time and trouble before I learned that the best way to take all people, black or white, is to take them for what they think they are, then leave them alone'.

Literature and english > Novel > The Sound and the Fury Author: William Faulkner Published: Table of Contents • So What? • Summary • Chapter-by-Chapter because none of the children produce any heirs.

Finally, corruption of the self or loss of innocence is very important in the story. This loss of innocence is most apparent. ANALYSIS BY SECTION. The Sound and the Fury (). William Faulkner () TITLE. The title refers to a phrase from Macbeth by Shakespeare: Life is “a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.”.

About The Sound and the Fury. Selected by the Modern Library as one of the best novels of all time From the Modern Library’s new set of beautifully repackaged hardcover classics by William Faulkner—also available are Snopes, As I Lay Dying, Light in August, Absalom, Absalom!, and Selected Short Stories The Sound and the Fury, first published in , is perhaps William Faulkner’s.

The Discovery of Loss in The Sound and the Fury