The inevitable tragedy that will befall creon and antigone

Father Cradock turns round slowly from the book he is eating and explains that it is just a face she is going through and they're all the same at that age. The play itself is was an important one, especially when it was first staged inbecause Antigone was seen as representing the French Resistance.

The inevitable tragedy that will befall creon and antigone

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: According to the misleading conception, the tragic consists in the defeat of human lives and projects that arises from irresolvable conflict. Goethe is the most notable exponent of this view. As soon as resolution enters or becomes possible the tragic vanishes.

It is easy to see how the two views support one another.

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For Hegel presents the tragic as a dialectic of conflict and reconciliation in human action, a dialectic in which the moment of reconciliation is ineliminable.

Hegel does not have a theory of tragedy, he has a theory of the tragic. A theory of tragedy would be genre-specific, a theory about tragedies, the works of theater and not the pitiable and terrifying events they represent.

It is a theory about the composition of tragic poems, about their parts and their function. By contrast, a theory of the tragic is not a theory about tragedies.

It is not genre specific, for not only tragedies are tragic. Rather, it is a theory about what makes a work of theater into a tragedy, about what it is to be a tragedy. True, the essence of tragedy has to do with experience, but it has to do primarily with the experience of the tragic hero, not the experience of the actor or the spectator.

Furthermore, whereas a theory of tragedy tells us something about tragedies, a theory of the tragic tells us something about human experience, human actions and the ethical-life of a community in which the actions are played out.

Hence the question of the tragic enjoys a certain priority over the question of tragedy. The works of theater we call tragedies exist because of the tragic, not vice versa. There is another reason why we should grant that the question of the tragic as such is interesting and relevant. Tragedy is not a vague term; historically at least the matter of classification has been settled.

Since she loves bothof her brothers, Antigone decides toburyPolyneices in spite of Creon's order and tries to enlist her sister, Ismene, in the task. Ismene refuses to break Creon's law. Antigone says the lawofthe Gods is more important than mortal man's law. While the prophet predicted tragedy would befall Creon's house, the chorus' use of words here is ironic, given that the prophet did not have a hand in what actually happened nor is the outcome good. View all notes The tragedy’s original audience should not be supposed to have believed that Creon’s decree was a mistake from the outset. 30 30 See also D Cairns, Sophocles: Antigone (Bloomsbury, London ) 38–39, noting, however, that ‘[t]here can be no doubt that Creon’s prohibition of burial is ultimately shown to be wrong.

It is not as if, in significant instances, it is impossible to decide whether a work of ancient drama is or is not a tragedy. Lebeck may argue, rather unconvincingly that the trial scene in the Eumenides is a parody of Athenian litigation; but she does not dispute that it is a tragedy.

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You are not currently authenticated. View freely available titles:View all notes The tragedy’s original audience should not be supposed to have believed that Creon’s decree was a mistake from the outset. 30 30 See also D Cairns, Sophocles: Antigone (Bloomsbury, London ) 38–39, noting, however, that ‘[t]here can be no doubt that Creon’s prohibition of burial is ultimately shown to be wrong.

In Sophocles’s tragedy, Antigone, the meaning and recognition of fate heavily weighs down Creon’s pride and Antigone’s love.

"Not To Be Born Is Best"

With a sense of lawful righteousness and tyranny, Creon believes burying Polynices is truly unlawful and seeks obedience in his resolution.

Antigone might be the name of the tragedy, but I believe that Creon is the winning candidate. His role in the plot of this tragedy, his sensible tragic fault, and his dynamic character are the obvious reasons why I chose him as the tragic hero.

Against this Hegel sees in Greek tragedy in general, and in the Antigone in particular, not a conflict between good and evil, but a conflict between good and good. Neither Antigone nor . Creon is bound to ideas of good sense, simplicity, and the banal happiness of everyday life.

Oedipus at Colonus Quotes - initiativeblog.com

To Creon, life is but the happiness one makes, the happiness that inheres in a grasped tool, a garden bench, a child playing at one's feet.

Uninterested in playing the villain in his niece's tragedy, Creon has no desire to sentence Antigone to death. TRAGEDY AND THE TRAGIC.

(15, –6). Hegel’s theory of the tragic rules out the possibility that tragic fate could simply befall the heroine, without her in any way bringing it upon herself.

The inevitable tragedy that will befall creon and antigone

The collision between the two highest moral powers is enacted in plastic fashion in that absolute exemplum of tragedy, Antigone Creon is not.

Summer Reading - Hegel/Antigone